Places– of charm

Do you like the idea of recycled building materials as much as I do?  My Alma Mater, University of Iowa, a major national research university in Iowa City, presented Sika Sarnafil Inc (located in Massachusettes) with a Sustainable Roofing Performance Award.  And, U of Iowa, demonstrated its decision by recycling its old Sarnafil roof on the Carver-Hawkeye Arena.

Sarnafil, as a roof building material, has been around for about three decades.  The arena’s 1981 roof was Sarnafil, but it was aging.

The ability to recycle is an important factor in determining the sustainability of a building material. Recycling reduces the environmental impacts of producing new materials at the beginning of the lifecycle and the burden on landfills at the end.  Vinyl recycling is well established with millions of pounds recycled every year. The sustainability movement along with increasing landfill restrictions and disposal fees is escalating the demand to recycle roofs at the end of their useful life.  Now I’m hearing that Los Angeles based architects have tried Sarnafil for homes.  One particular home has an engaging and casual design.  The house belongs to artist Joe Sola and wife Erin Wright, director of special projects at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.  Their white Sarnafil exterior house reflects heat and even expands and contracts with changes in temperature.


Photo of Sola home is courtesy Escher GuneWardena Architecture
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8 thoughts on “Places– of charm

  1. Kathleen Rowland

    The top floor has floor-to-ceiling windows with views of Burbank to the west and Elyria Canyon Park to the East. The tri-cube home is tucked into the landscape in the least invasive way.

  2. The floor plan is unique also. The bottom floor is pretty regular with a garage and studio. The second floor has three bedrooms, an open library and gallery space. The top floor “penthouse” is the living area.

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