Eat– for Good Health

Oprah enjoys Celery Root Soup with Granny Smith Apples and Chive Oil, invented by chef Tal Ronnen who prepared it for a show.   Unveiled below, this soup tastes really creamy but is 330 calories.  Dots of chive oil give it a dramatic appearance around a dollop of sour cream and diced apple.  Pretty, isn’t it!  Celery root is available in most produce departments.  To make Tal’s cashew cream and Chive Oil, I’ve tucked his recipes under the soup recipe below.

Tal Ronnen's Celery Root Soup
Photo is courtesy of Linda Long.

Ingredients for Celery Root Soup with Granny Smith Apples makes 6 servings:

  • Sea salt
  • 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium celery roots , peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 2 stalks celery , chopped
  • 1 large onion , chopped
  • 2 quarts vegetable broth
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup thick Cashew Cream
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 unpeeled Granny Smith apple , very finely diced
  • Chive Oil

Place a large stockpot over medium heat. Sprinkle the bottom with a pinch of salt and heat for 1 minute. Add the oil and heat for 30 seconds, being careful not to let it smoke. This will create a nonstick effect.

Add the celery root, celery, and onion and sauté for 6 to 10 minutes, stirring often, until soft but not brown. Add the stock and bay leaf, bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Add the Cashew Cream and simmer for an additional 10 minutes.

Working in batches, pour the soup into a blender, cover the lid with a towel (the hot liquid tends to erupt), and blend on high. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Ladle into bowls. Place a spoonful of the diced apple in the center of each serving, drizzle the Chive Oil around the apple, and serve.

Recipe for Cashew Cream:

  • 2 cups whole raw cashews (not pieces, which are often dry), rinsed very well under cold water

Put the cashews in a bowl and add cold water to cover them. Cover the bowl and refrigerate overnight.

Drain the cashews and rinse under cold water. Place in a blender with enough fresh cold water to cover them by 1 inch. Blend on high for several minutes until very smooth. (If you’re not using a professional high-speed blender such as a Vita-Mix, which creates an ultra-smooth cream, strain the cashew cream through a fine-mesh sieve.)

To make thick cashew cream, which some of the recipes in this book call for, simply reduce the amount of water in the blender, so that the water just covers the cashews.

Now for the Chive Oil:

  • 1 small bunch chives
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • Pinch sea salt
  • Freshly ground pepper

Blanch the chives for 30 seconds in boiling water, then drain and chill in an ice bath. Drain, wrap the chives in a towel, and squeeze the moisture out. Place in a blender with the remaining ingredients and blend for 2 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve. Put the chive oil in a plastic squeeze bottle with a small opening or use a spoon for drizzling it on the soup.

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10 thoughts on “Eat– for Good Health

  1. Mary Alice Tallmadge

    Looks interesting but soooo fussy. Makes me appreciate the simple recipes in your book, Kathleen. I don’t have all day to make soup.

  2. Kathleen Rowland

    Okay! I did have my nerve putting this up! How about lunch this Saturday? I’m only making the soup and a green salad. The three of you are invited. Since the soup is labor intensive, I will double the recipe. We will divide the rest up to save for husbands. Mine works very hard during tax season, and this will make an interesting accompaniment with Saturday night’s dinner.

  3. Kathleen Rowland

    Because the special little soup I’m making contains cashews, this gives it 4 grams of protein per serving. Mary Alice, you are bringing the salad– could you please add lean turkey or chopped egg whites to up the protein?

  4. This soup does have nutritional punch– celery and celery root contain ovarian cancer fighting apigenin, a type of flavonoid. Cashews improve blood pressure, and apples fight heart disease with phyto-nutrients, making bad cholesterol less harmful. Not that I’m suggesting anyone eats bad cholesterol.

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