People craft– getting along with yourself

If your mom or dad has low bone density, “your risk for osteoporosis is double that of someone who doesn’t have family history” according to Felicia Cosman, MD, an osteoporosis specialist is West Haverstraw, NY.  To mitigate that risk, consume 1,000 to 1,500 milligrams of calcium and at least 1,000 international units of vitamin D daily, and eat lots of fruit and vegetables.  Weight bearing-aerobic exercise on most days and strength-training exercises two to three times a week can also help you build and maintain bone density.  Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and loss of bone tissue that may lead to weak and fragile bones. If you have osteoporosis, you have an increased risk for fractured bones (broken bones).

Osteoporosis : Young slim female has backache Stock Photo

Illustration shows normal bone density and weakened bone affected by osteoporosis.

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8 thoughts on “People craft– getting along with yourself

  1. Friends, I am going to have my first bone density test when I get my annual mammogram next week. It’s a simple, painless test that takes only minutes. A bone mineral density (BMD) test, also called densitometry (DEXA) scan, can help you stay on top of your bone health. It uses special X-rays to measure the amount of calcium in the bones. This determines your actual bone mass.

    Results will = show me whether I have osteoporosis. I expect to have some bone loss because I am post-menopausal.

  2. Mary Alice Tallmadge

    Kathleen, I’m not but wanted to have the bone scan anyway since my mother suffers from it. Getting a BMD test doesn’t require any special preparation. You don’t even have to undress. The DEXA scan passes over your body, reading your bone density in different areas. Your doctor can explain the results to you.

  3. Mary Alice Tallmadge

    Normal, Reba. Unlike my mom, I’ve been a huge consumer of low fat and nonfat dairy products. I also like spinach which contains calcium. I put it in stir fries and soups– sneaking it in for my husband, Rob, and our sons, Max and Jake.

  4. Kathleen Rowland

    That’s really good, Mary Alice, because osteoporosis is sometimes called “the silent thief.” It quietly robs your bone strength over time. There are no real osteoporosis symptoms, so you can’t feel your bones getting weaker. In fact, some women learn they have thinning bones only after they break a bone.

    Are you planning to be tested, Reba?

  5. Mary Alice Tallmadge

    In my mom’s case, osteoporosis made her bones so fragile that she broke a shoulder bone when lifting a grocery bag!

  6. Kathleen Rowland

    Oh no, I’m sorry to hear that, Mary Alice. The risk of fractures (broken bones) is serious. It’s estimated that osteoporosis is to blame for about 1.5 million fractures every year.

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